Archives for category: vegetarian

P1070307
Food

1 Pablano Pepper

1/2 Yellow Onion

3 Garlic Gloves

6 Eggs

4 Slices Pepper Jack Cheese

Basil

Olive Oil

Vinegar

Butter

Salt & Pepper

Sourdough Bread

Dinosaur Kale

Green Tea

  • Chop and saute pepper + onion in butter.
  • Meanwhile, clean, cut and set to steam 4 leaves of kale in a covered pan of water.
  • Add Garlic to a teaspoon of olive oil in the middle of skillet once onions are translucent.
  • After just a minute or so, stir garlic in with the rest of the pan and then move the vegetables to the sides of the pan.
  • Add eggs and scramble them, mixing in the vegetables once their close to finished.
  • Add chopped basil + cheese slices and cover.
  • Toast sourdough bread.
  • Remove steamed kale and mix with salt, pepper, olive oil, and vinegar of choice.
  • Butter toast and serve with eggs + tea (serves 3)

Music
SF085

“The musical style most prominently focused on in this volume is the infamous Iraqi choubi, (pronounced choe-bee), with its distinct driving rhythm that can feature fiddles, double-reed instruments, bass, keyboards and oud over its signature beat.Choubi is Iraq’s version of the regionally popular dabke, another celebratory Levantine folkloric style of rhythm and line dance. What really defines the Iraqi choubi sound are the crisp, rapid-fire machine-gun style percussive rhythms set atop the main beat. To the uninitiated, they sound almost electronic. Sometimes they are, but more often this is the work of the khishba – a unique hand-drum of nomadic origin (aka the zanbour – Arabic for wasp), which appears across the board in many styles of Iraqi music today, with extensions of it also heard in Syrian and Kuwaiti music.
           What has happened to Iraq since the 2003 US invasion and eventual occupation? Endless death, destruction and chaos, the complete take-down of a functional sovereign secular government [regardless of your opinion on that government], puppet installations, contrived sectarian divisions, the wholesale looting of culture, rampant opportunism, and apparently no lessons learned – all at the Iraqi people’s expense.” 

           The tracks on this collection were produced during the Saddam era – between the 1980s and early-2000s. An important goal within the Iraqi Baathist agenda was to promote its brand of secularism, which saw the establishment of cultural centres, and a fostering of the arts. Music was more encouraged, albeit more institutionalized than ever – particularly folkloric and heritage music such as choubi. In an Iraqi army comprised of seven divisions, Saddam referred to singers as the eighth. Still, unless a rare level of stardom has been achieved, being a singer or musician isn’t usually encouraged or viewed as a respectable lifestyle in much of the Arab world. It’s often those deemed social outsiders that tend to find their niche in music – particularly the ‘party music’ heard on this collection. Among them are the Rom Gypsy Iraqis (known as Kawliya in Arabic). A number of female singers wear masks and adopt pseudonyms to protect their identities, as some are runaways or prostitutes making ends meet in the seedy nightclub scene. Occasionally, they end up with successful recording careers.”
Sublime Frequencies  PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE, WA 98127 USA

 

Foto

by Alexander

P1060406b

Food

I’ve been quiet the last couple of months due to hand surgery to repair a torn scapholunate ligament.  Yet now summer is here, so let the good times roll!  This one is to ease back into things –super simple and simply delicious.

  • Three Eggs
  • Butter
  • Nancy’s Cottage Cheese
  • Green Tabasco
  • One Tomato
  • Fresh Cilantro
  • Basil (fresh if you have it, dry if you don’t)
  • Olive Oil
  • Sea Salt
  • Tellicherry Black Pepper
  • Organic Blue Corn Chips
  • Green Tea

–Start iron skillet on high flame.
–Crack eggs into bowl, add a grind of sea salt + black pepper, and stir.
–Add butter to pan and lower heat to medium.
–Add eggs to pan, lifting up edges of egg once it’s cooked a few   seconds to let uncooked egg up underneath.
–Spread a couple Tbs of cottage cheese over half of the omelette and   sprinkle liberally w. green tabasco.
–Fold omelette and then flip onto serving plate.
–Turn heat to lowest setting and add a little olive oil.
–Chop tomato, cilantro, and basil (if fresh) and toss into skillet just to   warm it all up a couple minutes.
–Add more ground sea salt and pepper.
–Pour this mix over top of the omelette
–Serve with chips and the obligatory green tea of your choice

Eat with a smile

Music

Now_Please_Don't_You_Cry,_Beautiful_Edith

“Now Please Don’t You Cry, Beautiful Edith (about Kirk’s wife) was the first of his all groove sides.  Unlike Rip, Rig, and Panic from two years earlier in 1965, this set featured an in-the-pocket rhythm section. Adventure was not the name of the game on this date, feeling was — and for the job he got some of the finest cats working in the groove jazz idiom: drummer Grady Tate, pianist Lonnie Liston Smith, and bassist Ronnie Boykins. ”
Thom Jurek, Allmusic.com

Foto

by Alexander

r010751

Food

  1. Nancy’s Organic (sour) Cottage Cheese
  2. Banana
  3. Olive Oil
  4. Sea Salt
  5. Ground Pepper
  6. Yamamotoyama Organic Sencha Green Tea bag

Stir up a bowl of Nancy’s cottage cheese with lots of fresh ground pepper, a pinch of sea salt, and a tablespoon (plus) of olive oil.  Peel and eat banana.  Brew and drink tea.  Bam!


Music

a2345501174_2
New from Cincinnati’s Boy Froot 2014


Foto

by Alexander

wildBird_diptych
Food

  1. Morning Elixer 
  2. Ethiopian Coffee from Cafe Vita
  3. Free Range Eggs from Wilcox Farms
  4. Organic Dino Kale
  5. Basmati Rice
  6. Northwest Honey from Anna’s Farm
  7. Organic CostaRican Vanilla Extract
  8. Organic Raw Sugar
  9. Whole Milk from Twin Brook Creamery
  10. Olive Oil + Red Wine Vinegar
  11. Sea Salt
  12. Tellicherry Fresh Ground Black Pepper from The Spice House

Prepare + imbibe Morning Elixer (minus tea+nuts).  Wash Basmati rice until the water runs clear.  Put 1 cup rice + 1&3/4 cups H2O in pan, bring to boil, then turn down heat to lowest setting once H2O is at level of rice.  Cover for 15 minutes then turn off heat and put a folded towel over the pan to dry out the rice as it finishes it’s steaming.  Meanwhile, wash a bundle of Dino Kale and then tear the stems from the leaves, chopping both separately.  Place stems in bottom of steamer with chopped leaves on top and steam for 7-10 minutes, no longer so they stay bright green.  Put kettle on and subsequently brew Ethiopian Coffee.  Meanwhile, place seasoned iron skillet on high heat until it is good and hot, then add butter and just before browning turn down heat to medium-low. Drop in a couple of eggs to fry, flipping them after a couple minutes, at which point heat can be killed.  Simultaneously, steam a cup of Milk. Once Kale is done, toss the leaves and stems together in olive oil, red wine vinegar, and fresh ground salt and pepper.  Once milk is steamed, pour into bowl over 1 tsp Honey, a few drops of Vanilla, a couple shakes of cinnamon and then add 1/2cup rice.  Serve Eggs and Kale on a plate, rice + milk in a bowl, and a big mug of black coffee.  YUM!

Music
NCYbI
“After remaining unreleased for over a decade, the session that comprised Horace Parlan’s  Happy Frame of Mind record was issued as a Booker Ervin album entitled Back From the Gig.  Horace Parlan, however, was the leader for the session, and the album was originally scheduled to be released in the mid-’60s by Blue Note as Happy Frame of Mind. Back From the Gig finds Horace Parlan breaking away from the soul-inflected hard bop that had become his trademark, moving his music into more adventurous, post-bop territory. Aided by a first-rate quintet — trumpeter Johnny Coles, tenor saxophonist Booker Ervin, guitarist Grant Green, bassist Butch Warren, drummer Billy Higgins — Parlan produces a provocative set that is grounded in soul and blues but stretches out into challenging improvisations. None of the musicians completely embrace the avant-garde, but there are shifting tonal textures and unpredictable turns in the solos which have been previously unheard in Parlan’s music. Perhaps that’s the reason the session sat unissued in Blue Note’s vaults until 1976, when it was released as part of a double-record Booker Ervin set, but the fact of the matter is, it’s one of Parlan’s most successful efforts, finding the perfect middle ground between accessible, entertaining jazz and more adventurous music.”  –Stephen Thomas Erlewine, allmusic.com

Foto
by Alexander

dadwynWorld

Food

  1. two table spoons Chia seeds
  2. one handful of Kakao Nibs
  3. three table spoons of shelled Hemp seeds
  4. one table spoon Organic Free trade Coconut Oil
  5. one teaspoon of Matcha Green Tea
  6. two cups of frozen Mixed Berries
  7. six leaves of large leafed Kale
  8. one teaspoon of Blackberry Honey
  9. large handful of cashews

Whisk Chia until it is suspended in 1 cup of water, then add the Hemp and the cashew nuts to soak. Meanwhile, bring another cup of water to boil and when the kettle whistles, pour into a 2 cup glass to the 1 cup line.  Mix in Matcha with a small whisk and then add the Kakao Nibs. Add Mixed Berries and let melt.  Wash Kale and then tear stems apart from the kale.  Chop the kale stems, add them to the blender, tear up the Kale leaves and  put the leaves aside.  Take a small glass and fill with hot water from kettle and melt the coconut oil and honey. Put on ear plugs and add both the soaking and the melting cups  to the blender, then also add the small honey + coconut oil  and blend it all up. Stop the blender and add the  torn Kale leaves.  This should fill the blender to six cups, though if there is room for more water you can top it off.

Music
DVD-meisterklasse“Although there is no dearth of great performances of Bach’s Suites for solo cello — indeed, they seem to be increasing geometrically as the years go by — this 2003 recording by Maria Kliegel still deserves to be heard. Heck, it deserves to be embraced and cherished as one of the warmest, most human, and most moving performances of the Suites ever recorded. Listening to Kliegel, one is hardly aware of her magnificent technique any more than one is aware of her magisterial interpretations. Although deeply individualistic, Kliegel’s performances are so effortless, so natural, so inevitable that one is hardly aware that they are performances. One seems instead to hear the music without an intermediary, its long lines, its dark colors, and its ineluctable rhythms without mediation. Better yet, one seems to hear the emotional, the intellectual, and the spiritual contents of the music without intermediary, its brilliance, its evanescence, and its profundity without mediation. While Kliegel’s phrasing and tempos are all her own, the heights and depths of her performances seem greater than the sum of the phrasing and tempo. They appear to touch the infinite.”  —James Leonard, allmusic.com

Foto
by Alwyn + Alexander