Archives for category: Politics

P1070307
Food

1 Pablano Pepper

1/2 Yellow Onion

3 Garlic Gloves

6 Eggs

4 Slices Pepper Jack Cheese

Basil

Olive Oil

Vinegar

Butter

Salt & Pepper

Sourdough Bread

Dinosaur Kale

Green Tea

  • Chop and saute pepper + onion in butter.
  • Meanwhile, clean, cut and set to steam 4 leaves of kale in a covered pan of water.
  • Add Garlic to a teaspoon of olive oil in the middle of skillet once onions are translucent.
  • After just a minute or so, stir garlic in with the rest of the pan and then move the vegetables to the sides of the pan.
  • Add eggs and scramble them, mixing in the vegetables once their close to finished.
  • Add chopped basil + cheese slices and cover.
  • Toast sourdough bread.
  • Remove steamed kale and mix with salt, pepper, olive oil, and vinegar of choice.
  • Butter toast and serve with eggs + tea (serves 3)

Music
SF085

“The musical style most prominently focused on in this volume is the infamous Iraqi choubi, (pronounced choe-bee), with its distinct driving rhythm that can feature fiddles, double-reed instruments, bass, keyboards and oud over its signature beat.Choubi is Iraq’s version of the regionally popular dabke, another celebratory Levantine folkloric style of rhythm and line dance. What really defines the Iraqi choubi sound are the crisp, rapid-fire machine-gun style percussive rhythms set atop the main beat. To the uninitiated, they sound almost electronic. Sometimes they are, but more often this is the work of the khishba – a unique hand-drum of nomadic origin (aka the zanbour – Arabic for wasp), which appears across the board in many styles of Iraqi music today, with extensions of it also heard in Syrian and Kuwaiti music.
           What has happened to Iraq since the 2003 US invasion and eventual occupation? Endless death, destruction and chaos, the complete take-down of a functional sovereign secular government [regardless of your opinion on that government], puppet installations, contrived sectarian divisions, the wholesale looting of culture, rampant opportunism, and apparently no lessons learned – all at the Iraqi people’s expense.” 

           The tracks on this collection were produced during the Saddam era – between the 1980s and early-2000s. An important goal within the Iraqi Baathist agenda was to promote its brand of secularism, which saw the establishment of cultural centres, and a fostering of the arts. Music was more encouraged, albeit more institutionalized than ever – particularly folkloric and heritage music such as choubi. In an Iraqi army comprised of seven divisions, Saddam referred to singers as the eighth. Still, unless a rare level of stardom has been achieved, being a singer or musician isn’t usually encouraged or viewed as a respectable lifestyle in much of the Arab world. It’s often those deemed social outsiders that tend to find their niche in music – particularly the ‘party music’ heard on this collection. Among them are the Rom Gypsy Iraqis (known as Kawliya in Arabic). A number of female singers wear masks and adopt pseudonyms to protect their identities, as some are runaways or prostitutes making ends meet in the seedy nightclub scene. Occasionally, they end up with successful recording careers.”
Sublime Frequencies  PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE, WA 98127 USA

 

Foto

by Alexander

P1050701b
No Food – Live 
Music

I went to the Seattle Chamber Music Series today and heard a program that included:
Britten: Phantasy Quartet in F minor for Oboe and Strings, Op. 2download audio sample
Dvořák: String Quintet No. 2 in G major, Op. 77 download audio sample

Schulhoff: Duo for Violin and Cello
Poulenc: Sextet for Piano and Wind Quintet, Op. 100 download audio sample

They were supposed to include Shostakovich’s 13th String Quartet –which is what initially drew me to the performance– however they replaced it with Schulhoff, with whom I was totally unfamiliar.  Turns out to have been the show stopper which got the only standing ovation (no doubt in part due to Walter Gray, cello and Mikhail Shmidt, violin, the latter whom was particularly animated [“historionic” I heard one woman say after the show]).  Anyway, in his time, Schulhoff was apparently quite a character,  even setting the communist manifesto to music as an oratorio.  Tragically, because of his Jewish descent and his radical politics, he and his works were labelled degenerate and blacklisted by the Nazi regime and his life and career were tragically cut short by tuberculosis in the Wulzburg concentration camp in 1942. Until very recently Schulhoff’s work was rarely noted or performed.  It is definitely worth hearing!

Read about him
Schulhoff_Mayerova_1931
“Absolute art is revolution, it requires additional facets for development, leads to overthrow (coups) in order to open new paths…and is the most powerful in music…. The idea of revolution in art has evolved for decades, under whatever sun the creators live, in that for them art is the commonality of man. This is particularly true in music, because this art form is the liveliest, and as a result reflects the revolution most strongly and deeply–the complete escape from imperialistic tonality and rhythm, the climb to an ecstatic change for the better.”  –Erwin Schulhoff, 1919

Listen to his Duoschulhoff

 

Foto

by Alexander

_R011084b

Food

  1. One+ lbs. Beef Tenderloin
  2. Fresh Beef Bone Broth (Prepare in advance)
  3. One small Red Cabbage
  4. OneRed Onion
  5. Five cloves Garlic
  6. One bundle Dinosaur Kale
  7. Spinach
  8. Rice Noodles
  9. Butter
  10. Olive Oil
  11. Fish Sauce
  12. Chilli Paste
  13. Soy Sauce
  14. Hijiki, Wakame, & Kombu seaweed
  15. Button Shitake Mushrooms
  • Chop onion and saute in half a stick of butter in a large pan.
  • Chop cabbage and add to onion.
  • Tear kale stems from leaves, chop them separately and add the stems to the pan
  • In the background, have the broth heating up.
  • In the foreground, chop the tenderloin into cubes.
  • Brown meat  iron skillet on high flame + remove  from heat after turning once.
  • Crush garlic cloves
  • When onion and cabbage are pretty thoroughly sauteed, spread them  to the sides of the pan and in the open space in the middle, add a tbs olive oil, fish sauce, and the garlic (mind the flame is low)
  • Saute garlic combination two minutes + then mix together contents of pan.
  • Add to broth together with chopped kale leaves and as much spinach as you like.
  • Add seaweed + whole button shitake mushrooms
  • Let soup simmer and just before serving, add a handful of rice noodles.
  • Add meat separately so that it doesn’t heat beyond warming up in the soup bowl.
  • Add soy sauce and chili paste to taste.
  • YUM!

Music

theknife_ShakingTheHabitual

The Knife, Shaking the Habitual  <–read the great comic, End Extreme Weatlth!
“Within the album’s expanse, these are moments that alternately seethe and soothe, testing and prodding both the listener’s expectations and his or her patience. They also massage the album’s plentiful organic charges into a sonic puzzle with an almost symphonic reach, one that’s as challenging, bounteous, and ultimately unknowable as anything you’ll hear this year.”   –residentadvisor.net

Foto

by Alexander

P1050130

Book
“The financial collapse and Occupy’s insight have shattered the bipartisan conservative consensus that dominated both parties after Reagan –on austerity, deregulation, free trade, privatization and more. Now progressives have the more compelling argument: for a generation, they argue, entrenched interests have rigged the rules, lowering taxes on the rich and stashing trillions abroad.  They starved investments vital to our future, from renovating decrepit infrastructure to supporting public education from pre-K to college. Multinationals defined trade policies that racked up record deficits and shipped jobs abroad.  Insurance and drug companies hiked healthcare costs to the highest in the wold, as quality lagged. Banks have been rescued; homeowners and students have been abandoned. The old policies are serving only the few”

— The New Insurgents by Robert L. Borosage, The Nation, Oct.21, 2013

Music
ExodusIntoUnheardRhythms

“The basic conceit of Exodus Into Unheard Rhythms, that hip-hop producer Oh No sampled exclusively from the catalogue of composer Galt MacDermot, is a clever one….. At the center of this project is a 78-year-old man who’s welcomed producers…into his home to peruse his collection for sample records….. Galt grew up listening to his musical father’s records and studied and internalized the local music when his family moved to South Africa during his college years. Oh No’s beginnings are similar. Born into a musical family with an encouraging musician father, he parsed what he liked and developed it…. So the union of these two artists, from different times and places, who simply love music and made it their lives is, I can’t lie, heartening. I realize that’s a very rosy and uncool way to look at the world, but Exodus Into Unheard Rhythms just kind of does that to you.”
Peter Macia; December 13, 2006, Pitchfork

Foto
by Alexander