Archives for category: classical

P1050701b
No Food – Live 
Music

I went to the Seattle Chamber Music Series today and heard a program that included:
Britten: Phantasy Quartet in F minor for Oboe and Strings, Op. 2download audio sample
Dvořák: String Quintet No. 2 in G major, Op. 77 download audio sample

Schulhoff: Duo for Violin and Cello
Poulenc: Sextet for Piano and Wind Quintet, Op. 100 download audio sample

They were supposed to include Shostakovich’s 13th String Quartet –which is what initially drew me to the performance– however they replaced it with Schulhoff, with whom I was totally unfamiliar.  Turns out to have been the show stopper which got the only standing ovation (no doubt in part due to Walter Gray, cello and Mikhail Shmidt, violin, the latter whom was particularly animated [“historionic” I heard one woman say after the show]).  Anyway, in his time, Schulhoff was apparently quite a character,  even setting the communist manifesto to music as an oratorio.  Tragically, because of his Jewish descent and his radical politics, he and his works were labelled degenerate and blacklisted by the Nazi regime and his life and career were tragically cut short by tuberculosis in the Wulzburg concentration camp in 1942. Until very recently Schulhoff’s work was rarely noted or performed.  It is definitely worth hearing!

Read about him
Schulhoff_Mayerova_1931
“Absolute art is revolution, it requires additional facets for development, leads to overthrow (coups) in order to open new paths…and is the most powerful in music…. The idea of revolution in art has evolved for decades, under whatever sun the creators live, in that for them art is the commonality of man. This is particularly true in music, because this art form is the liveliest, and as a result reflects the revolution most strongly and deeply–the complete escape from imperialistic tonality and rhythm, the climb to an ecstatic change for the better.”  –Erwin Schulhoff, 1919

Listen to his Duoschulhoff

 

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by Alexander

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Food

  1. two table spoons Chia seeds
  2. one handful of Kakao Nibs
  3. three table spoons of shelled Hemp seeds
  4. one table spoon Organic Free trade Coconut Oil
  5. one teaspoon of Matcha Green Tea
  6. two cups of frozen Mixed Berries
  7. six leaves of large leafed Kale
  8. one teaspoon of Blackberry Honey
  9. large handful of cashews

Whisk Chia until it is suspended in 1 cup of water, then add the Hemp and the cashew nuts to soak. Meanwhile, bring another cup of water to boil and when the kettle whistles, pour into a 2 cup glass to the 1 cup line.  Mix in Matcha with a small whisk and then add the Kakao Nibs. Add Mixed Berries and let melt.  Wash Kale and then tear stems apart from the kale.  Chop the kale stems, add them to the blender, tear up the Kale leaves and  put the leaves aside.  Take a small glass and fill with hot water from kettle and melt the coconut oil and honey. Put on ear plugs and add both the soaking and the melting cups  to the blender, then also add the small honey + coconut oil  and blend it all up. Stop the blender and add the  torn Kale leaves.  This should fill the blender to six cups, though if there is room for more water you can top it off.

Music
DVD-meisterklasse“Although there is no dearth of great performances of Bach’s Suites for solo cello — indeed, they seem to be increasing geometrically as the years go by — this 2003 recording by Maria Kliegel still deserves to be heard. Heck, it deserves to be embraced and cherished as one of the warmest, most human, and most moving performances of the Suites ever recorded. Listening to Kliegel, one is hardly aware of her magnificent technique any more than one is aware of her magisterial interpretations. Although deeply individualistic, Kliegel’s performances are so effortless, so natural, so inevitable that one is hardly aware that they are performances. One seems instead to hear the music without an intermediary, its long lines, its dark colors, and its ineluctable rhythms without mediation. Better yet, one seems to hear the emotional, the intellectual, and the spiritual contents of the music without intermediary, its brilliance, its evanescence, and its profundity without mediation. While Kliegel’s phrasing and tempos are all her own, the heights and depths of her performances seem greater than the sum of the phrasing and tempo. They appear to touch the infinite.”  —James Leonard, allmusic.com

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by Alwyn + Alexander