P1070307
Food

1 Pablano Pepper

1/2 Yellow Onion

3 Garlic Gloves

6 Eggs

4 Slices Pepper Jack Cheese

Basil

Olive Oil

Vinegar

Butter

Salt & Pepper

Sourdough Bread

Dinosaur Kale

Green Tea

  • Chop and saute pepper + onion in butter.
  • Meanwhile, clean, cut and set to steam 4 leaves of kale in a covered pan of water.
  • Add Garlic to a teaspoon of olive oil in the middle of skillet once onions are translucent.
  • After just a minute or so, stir garlic in with the rest of the pan and then move the vegetables to the sides of the pan.
  • Add eggs and scramble them, mixing in the vegetables once their close to finished.
  • Add chopped basil + cheese slices and cover.
  • Toast sourdough bread.
  • Remove steamed kale and mix with salt, pepper, olive oil, and vinegar of choice.
  • Butter toast and serve with eggs + tea (serves 3)

Music
SF085

“The musical style most prominently focused on in this volume is the infamous Iraqi choubi, (pronounced choe-bee), with its distinct driving rhythm that can feature fiddles, double-reed instruments, bass, keyboards and oud over its signature beat.Choubi is Iraq’s version of the regionally popular dabke, another celebratory Levantine folkloric style of rhythm and line dance. What really defines the Iraqi choubi sound are the crisp, rapid-fire machine-gun style percussive rhythms set atop the main beat. To the uninitiated, they sound almost electronic. Sometimes they are, but more often this is the work of the khishba – a unique hand-drum of nomadic origin (aka the zanbour – Arabic for wasp), which appears across the board in many styles of Iraqi music today, with extensions of it also heard in Syrian and Kuwaiti music.
           What has happened to Iraq since the 2003 US invasion and eventual occupation? Endless death, destruction and chaos, the complete take-down of a functional sovereign secular government [regardless of your opinion on that government], puppet installations, contrived sectarian divisions, the wholesale looting of culture, rampant opportunism, and apparently no lessons learned – all at the Iraqi people’s expense.” 

           The tracks on this collection were produced during the Saddam era – between the 1980s and early-2000s. An important goal within the Iraqi Baathist agenda was to promote its brand of secularism, which saw the establishment of cultural centres, and a fostering of the arts. Music was more encouraged, albeit more institutionalized than ever – particularly folkloric and heritage music such as choubi. In an Iraqi army comprised of seven divisions, Saddam referred to singers as the eighth. Still, unless a rare level of stardom has been achieved, being a singer or musician isn’t usually encouraged or viewed as a respectable lifestyle in much of the Arab world. It’s often those deemed social outsiders that tend to find their niche in music – particularly the ‘party music’ heard on this collection. Among them are the Rom Gypsy Iraqis (known as Kawliya in Arabic). A number of female singers wear masks and adopt pseudonyms to protect their identities, as some are runaways or prostitutes making ends meet in the seedy nightclub scene. Occasionally, they end up with successful recording careers.”
Sublime Frequencies  PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE, WA 98127 USA

 

Foto

by Alexander

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